Megalitter i Wales

Skal man til Wales mødes man af et sprog, der i sit opbygning er meget forskellig fra andre sprog.

Og hvor ellers kan man finde et bynavn, der er så langt, og så umuligt at udtale for os, der kommer fra andre lande:
llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrob wllllantysiliogogogoch

som oversat betyder "The church of St. Mary in the hollow of white hazel trees near the rapid whirlpool by St. Tysilio's of the red cave".

Det eneste længere jeg har funder er faktisk det thaiske navn på Bangkok:
Krungthepmahanakonbowornratanakosinmahintarayudyayamahadilopo
noparatanarajthaniburiromudomrajniwesmahasatarn
amornpimarnavatarsatitsakattiyavisanukamphrasit
Som oversat betyder:
The translation here is pretty much the unabridged history of the city rather than a word.
krungthep mahanakon
The land of angels, the great city of
amorn rattanakosin
immortality, various of devine gems,
mahintara yudthaya mahadilok pohp
the great angelic land unconquerable,
noparat rajathanee bureerom
land of nine noble gems, the royal city, the pleasant capital,
udomrajniwes mahasatarn
place of the grand royal palace,
amorn pimarn avaltarnsatit
forever land of angels and reincarnated spirits,
sakatattiya visanukram prasit
predestined and created by the highest devas.


Four Stones (Powys)

Stone Circle in Powys

This site is a nice example of a ‘four poster’, sites commonly found in Scotland. The four stones stand in a small ring and have been misinterpreted as being the remains of a burial chamber. One of the blocks to the south-west has three possible cupmarks on it. Judicious parking for 1 vehicle near a gate to the north of the stones.



Maengwyngweddew

Have you ever tried looking for a squat white standing stone, about 85cm tall, with uncertain directions, and a mountainside of sheep? Not easy. This took me two attempts. An aborted attempt on my birthday left me disappointed and frustrated, wishing I'd purchased the 1:25000, and not the 1:50000. Sob sob. Thankfully, my family had pity upon me, and I returned a couple days later with new attitude



Eglwys Gwyddelod Stone Circle

Stone Circle in Gwynedd

Eglwys Gwyddelod "The Irishman's Church" stone circle is a delightful small circle in beautiful surroundings. Five small stones and two stumps make up a circle 8m in diameter. At the centre of the circle is a quartz boulder which is believed to have been an original feature of the site.



What is the longest place name in Wales and where is this village?

llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrob wllllantysiliogogogoch (withour the space); which translates as : "The church of St. Mary in the hollow of white hazel trees near the rapid whirlpool by St. Tysilio's of the red cave"

It's on the North Wales island of Anglesey



bangkok Krungthepmahanakonbowornratanakosinmahintarayudyayamahadilopo noparatanarajthaniburiromudomrajniwesmahasatarn amornpimarnavatarsatitsakattiyavisanukamphrasit The translation here is pretty much the unabridged history of the city rather than a word. krungthep mahanakhon The land of angels, the great city of amorn rattanakosin immortality, various of devine gems, mahintara yudthaya mahadilok pohp the great angelic land unconquerable, noparat rajathanee bureerom land of nine noble gems, the royal city, the pleasant capital, udomrajniwes mahasatarn place of the grand royal palace, amorn pimarn avaltarnsatit forever land of angels and reincarnated spirits, sakatattiya visanukram prasit predestined and created by the highest devas.

Again, we have no pictures of a welcome sign on the road leading into Bangkok and, besides, what is Bangkok? H



Wales Town Changes Name to Longest in UK in Protest

Residents of Llanfynydd in Carmarthenshire, Wales are changing the name of their town to the 66-character-long Llanhyfryddawelllehyn-afolybarcudprindanfygythiadtrienusyrhafnauole to protest the development of a wind power plant nearby. The new name means "A quiet beautiful village, an historic place with rare kite under threat from wretched blades."







Gwern Einion

Dolmen in Gwynedd

Gwern Einion stands on the banks of the River Artro and is a typical example of a Portal Dolmen. The capstone rests on two portal stones which are approximately 6 ft high, sloping backwards to a 3ft back stone. Only the side stone to the south remains in place.

The tomb has been badly damaged – the burial chamber was turned into a shed by the farmer and the cairn has been robbed to build the nearby dry-stone walls.



Cefn Maen Amor

A view to the south, showing the western arc of the stones. The mound to the south is across the track. Cefn Maen Amor stone circle has absurdly small stones, no higher than 1 foot, and easily lost under the bilberry and heather. Marked on OS maps as a cairn just to the north west of Maen Penddu standing stone, on a higher track, this is situated on a flat area, just beneath the highest terrain



Eglwys St. Aelhaearn Church Llanaelhaearn

Early Christian Sculptured Stone in Gwynedd

The church in Llanaelhaearn is named after its founder, St. Aelheam from the 7C. There are early Christian inscribed stones in the church and outside in the grave yard.

There is a roughly hewn stone inscribed vertically in Roman capitals to the south of the gate.



Four Crosses

Burial chamber in a small village called Four Crosses on land near a farm named Cromlech and standing stone that is only yards away.



In the remote valleys and hillsides of Wales lie stone monuments, the legacy of a civilisation long gone. Most have lain undisturbed for nearly 5,000 years ravaged by the wind and the rain, overgrown with moss and lichen. The purpose of these monuments remains largely a mystery however through the work of dedicated researchers such as A. & A. S. Thom and A. Burl a picture is emerging of the function of these stone structures. Many of the stone circles and standing stones or menhirs (from the welsh maen hir 'long stone') have alignements with astronomical events such as the rising and setting of the sun, moon and the brighter stars. These alignements also track the seasons, indicating mid-summer, mid-winter and the equinoxes. These 'stone calenders' recorded events that probably had a major significance to the peoples of that time. They could have indicated when to plant crops, when to undertake religous ceremonies, even when to move south to warmer regions with the coming of winter. In the Welsh language 'Maen (Meini)' is used to describe large standing stones and 'Carreg (Cerrig)' is used to describe the smaller stones often found in welsh stone rings. Both these words mean stone and are often interchanged. I have spent many hours in the peace and tranquility of these remote sites recording both the geometry and undertaking photography of these stone structures, often I have found arrangements and alignements overlooked by previous researchers, these are recorded here.



Arthur's Stone

A Neolithic chambered tomb on Dorstone Hill, near the village of Dorstone, Herefordshire.

Although we usually only cover Welsh monuments, this is right on our doorstep and well worth a visit. The site is a few miles outside Hay on Wye. From Hay, follow the B4348, and using the Land ranger as a reference take a left-hand turn at a place called The Bage. Follow the narrow road until you come to a junction, turn right and the monument will soon reveal itself to you as it lies adjacent to the road.

The monument would have originally have been covered by a mound approximately 20 metres by 15 metres. Although partly broken, the massive capstone still sits in place atop the structure’s uprights. It is believed the monument dates back to around 3700 BC.



Carreg Bica

This monument has to be seen, it is simply a monster. Getting there as it turns out is relatively simple, although as usual we had initial problems. Luckily a chance encounter with an extremely helpful couple out walking their dogs set us on the right road. It was a cold, wet, foggy November day when we first visited Carreg Bica.

As it turns out you can take the car all the way to the monument itself, although this would mean driving through fields of livestock, therefore parking just below the ridge, about five minutes walk away is by far the better option.

Approaching on the A465 from Hirwaun. Take the exit for Neath and go around the roundabout and under the flyover. Take the exit for Skewen and Neath Abbey. Go straight across the next roundabout, there is a Tesco store on your left. You will very soon come to two mini roundabouts, like a figure eight, turn right off the second and follow the road, it will lead to yet another mini roundabout and under a railway bridge, just stay on this road, over a number of speed humps.

After passing through the residential area follow the winding road, you will soon pass the Glyn Clydach Hotel on your right. Just round the corner you will come to a church on your left, as the road takes you around the church, take care, As the left turn you want is a very sharp turn, on a right hand bend. There is a sign as you turn directing you to Grange Farm, follow the road all the way up to the entrance of The Grange. You now bear right and continue along the road passed Cotland Cottage on your right. You will soon pass a big stone wall on your left, just before a small Transco gas compound, also on your left.

It is at this point the tarmac ends, and the road gets a little rough, to say the least. Follow the road passed Dyffryn Farm, on your right, all the way to a sharp left bend in front of Keepers Lodge. Keep on going up the hill to a sort of junction, just keep going straight up the hill. At the top we suggest you park up alongside the rocky mountainside on your right and continue on foot. You need to continue up the track behind you, through the gate and turn left, cutting across the field until you pick up the track again. This track will lead you to the foot of the monument.

Carreg Bica is an incredible stone as you can imagine it dominates the landscape. Although unfortunately slightly defaced, with names etched into it, Carreg Bica is once again an extremely captivating monument, with mesmerising panoramic views of the gorgeous surrounding countryside



Carreg Coetan

Heading toward Fishguard along the A487, you will enter the small village of Newport, you need to take the first right turn down toward the beach. As you drop down the hill there is a small group of houses on your left, with a private road sign clearly visible.

You must park along the main road as the sign indicates the road on your left is for residents access only and not for access to the monument. The monument itself is nestled between two houses in the far right hand corner as you approach, access to the site is granted through a small gate. Carreg Coetan consists of four uprights supporting a huge sloping capstone.

Excavations of the site revealed cremated bone and large traces of pottery, also during excavation charcoal taken from beneath an upright was carbon dated to around 2700 BC. Legend has it the stones that form Carreg Coetan were thrown from the summit of nearby Carningli.

As with so many sites it's well worth a visit, although its suburban surroundings have taken away some of the ambience of the site, its still a very special and significant place.



Maen Madoc

A Latin inscription along its edge reads ‘Dervaci filius ivsti, ic iacti’ which translated reads ‘Dervacus, the son of Justus, here he lies’, although an excavation of Maen Madoc over fifty years ago revealed no remains. Internet research has also shown that the only reference to "Dervaci" or "Dervacus" (a sixth century Roman name) is found only on Maen Madoc itself. Unfortunately, where the monument stands today is not its original position. Apparently, it was moved a number of metres, probably for the use of the road.

We were lucky to visit the site as the Autumn sun began to set, producing an amazing silhouette of the monolith. The glare of the sun capped the stone like a halo. It was an incredible sight to see.

Finding Maen Madoc is easy. From Ystradfellte, proceed toward Heol Senni along the winding road. You will pass a farm on your right and continue to climb, You will come to a forestry sign for Blaen Llia, just passed which you will come to your only turning on your left, just before a cattle grid. There is a sign saying Sarn Helen, this is the road you need. Park your car and go through the gate, the walk to the monument will take about 10 minutes. Continue up Sarn Helen, which is an old Roman road, until you get to the next gate, just through which you can see the monument on your left-hand side.

Externe referencer

For yderliger information, prøv at se på følgende hjemmesider:



Astronomical overview of megalithic sites in England & Wales











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